17.25”x13.25” Vajravarahi or Dorje Phagmo Thangka Painting

Vajravarahi / Dorje Phagmo - The female Buddha thangka beautifully painted by artist from Nepal.

Availability: In stock
SKU:
TH761768092705
$110.00

Name

Vajravarahi or Dorje PhagmoThangka

Size with Border

17.25" Long x 13.25" Wide

Size without Border

15" Long x 11" Wide

Material

Original Hand-Painted Cotton Canvas with 24 Karat Gold Detailing

Style

Tibetan

Weight

0.3 kg

Ships From

Bhaktapur, Nepal

Shipping Provider

 Express

Shipping Time

Usually ships within 48 hours. Allow 3-5 business days for delivery worldwide.

Insurance

Insurance is included in the shipping cost.

Vajravarahi / Dorje Phagmo - The female Buddha

Vajravarahi is also known as Dorje Phagmo, Vajravarahi is a representation of complete Buddhahood in female form, whose practices are associated with the Chakrasamvara Cycle of Anuttarayoga Tantra. Although her practice exists in all schools of Tibetan Buddhism, she is particularly associated with the Kagyu tradition and has appeared to and bestowed initiations on some Mahasiddhas over the years. Making offerings to her image makes a connection with this extremely potent Buddha and seeing her plants seeds of enlightenment in our mindstream. Her image pacifies our immediate environment, clears negative energy and protects from negative interferences.

Gestures and Attributes

Vajravarahi holds a cemetery knife in her right hand and a skull cup in her left. In the crook of her left elbow is a khatvanga staff and her two legs are in a celestial dancing posture on a human corpse. She is often depicted with a sow's head on the side of her own, symbolic of triumph of dharma over ignorance.

Iconography

Vajravarahi is depicted in red color with a wrathful expression, Vajravarahi has one face, two arms and three eyes with a small pig's head in her hair. She holds a cemetery knife in her right hand and a skull cup in her left. In the crook of her left elbow is a khatvanga staff and her two legs are in a celestial dancing posture on a human corpse. She is often depicted with a sow's head on the side of her own, symbolic of triumph of dharma over ignorance.